Bush honeysuckle

Invasive Bush Honeysuckle: Bad for Birds, Wildflowers and Water

(This piece was originally published in the October issue of Urban Times)

Bush honeysuckle is ubiquitous in our urban neighborhoods, especially along creeks and the White River. To the untrained eye, it can look like a fine use of untended corridors—something green is growing, and it smells nice and produces pretty red berries.

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Jamison Hutchins

Stewardship Manager

Jamison leads our stewardship team in caring for the land that is so important to you. He brings not only a love of nature, but an ability to create meaningful partnerships that advance crucial work.
Meltzer Woods photo by Jordan England

Road Trip: Meltzer Woods and Beyond

We asked Jordan England of Blue River Community Foundation to recommend some attractions near Meltzer Woods. The foundation has provided funding for Meltzer Woods stewardship for many years. Jordan serves as Grants and Nonprofit Relations Director at the foundation. She offered this guest post.

This fall, when you plan to visit Meltzer Woods, don’t miss exploring what else Shelby County has to offer!

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Jordan England

Guest Blogger

Jordan England is a lifelong Shelby County resident who graduated from Waldron Jr. Sr. High School (just a few miles from Meltzer Woods!). After earning her B.S. degree in Retail Management from Purdue University, she returned to Waldron to start a family with her husband, Brian. Together they have 3 young children and enjoy sharing with them their love of the community. Jordan is the Grants and Nonprofit Relations Director at Blue River Community Foundation, managing BRCF’s grant program, providing support to local nonprofits, and promoting catalytic philanthropy in Shelby County.
Tennessee Warbler

Tennessee Warbler Visits in Spring and Fall

Our spring newsmagazine featured Cliff’s top ten hidden gems of birding. Here is the ninth of a blog series on these birds, by guest blogger Ed Pope.

The Tennessee warbler appears in Indiana only as a transient. It breeds in Canada and in the northern portions of some states along the U.S.-Canada border. During the winter, it inhabits southern Mexico, Central America and the northernmost part of South America. In Indiana, you are most likely to see this bird during April/May and September/October.

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Ed Pope

Guest Blogger

Ed Pope is a retired engineer from Rolls-Royce and a CILTI member since 2002.
Fall hike at Blossom Hollow

With your Help, We Met our Match!

Our match goal, that is!

Thanks to your generous contributions over the summer months, we were able to receive a $50,000 matching challenge grant from the Herbert Simon Family Foundation. This effectively doubled the amount of acreage we are able to protect and restore. Continue reading

Shawndra Miller

Communications Manager

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.

CILTI to Receive Indiana DNR Funding

Central Indiana Land Trust has once again been approved for funding from the Community Hunting Access Program (CHAP), which is designed to increase hunting access and reduce conflicts with white-tailed deer.

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Shawndra Miller

Communications Manager

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
Photo by Greg Hess

The Wonder of the Monarch

(This piece was originally published in the September issue of Urban Times)

That monarch butterfly winging through your neighborhood has a whole story to tell. It’s a story of habitat loss and endangerment, but also wonder. Weighing less than a gram, this iconic species will take an incredible journey this fall. Continue reading

Shawndra Miller

Communications Manager

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
Northern parula warbler

Northern Parula Builds Nests of Moss

Our spring newsmagazine featured Cliff’s top ten hidden gems of birding. Here is the eighth of a blog series on these birds, by guest blogger Ed Pope.

The northern parula is a small warbler, roughly half the weight of a goldfinch. Its body looks slightly chubby, and its bill is thin and tail is short. White crescents line the eyes, and the plumage is bright yellow on the throat and chest. Males have a brown patch between the throat and chest. Most of the remainder of their feathers are a bluish-gray.

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Ed Pope

Guest Blogger

Ed Pope is a retired engineer from Rolls-Royce and a CILTI member since 2002.
Jamison Hutchins

Behind the Scenes with Stewardship Manager Jamison Hutchins

Our stewardship manager, Jamison Hutchins, recently took a walk through Nonie Werbe Krauss Nature Preserve while speaking with Freya Berntson. Freya’s podcast, Midwestoration, profiles people working in the conservation field.

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Shawndra Miller

Communications Manager

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
Black-eyed susan

Take Part in Citizen Science through this Scavenger Hunt

Do you love spending time outdoors and looking at the plants around you? Your observations could help add to scientific knowledge of Indiana’s native flora!

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Phillip Weldy

Stewardship Specialist

Phillip enjoys nature’s wonders from an up-close-and-personal perspective as he works to restore the natural places you love. He came to his stewardship role at CILTI after undertaking invasive species control and trail maintenance for Little Traverse Conservancy in Harbor Springs, MI.
Tree planting in Parke County

An Antidote to Bad News

Your actions make a difference!

A letter from our executive director

Everywhere we turn these days, we hear bad news about the state of the world. When it comes to the environment, things seem particularly dire. Habitat loss. Species extinction. The climate crisis. When you care about the natural world, the news can feel overwhelming. Continue reading

Cliff Chapman

Executive Director

As CILTI’s Executive Director, Cliff keeps CILTI’s focus on good science and stewardship. He’s mindful that the natural places you love took thousands of years to evolve and could be destroyed in a single day, and that knowledge drives his dedication to their protection.