Northern parula warbler

Northern Parula Builds Nests of Moss

Our spring newsmagazine featured Cliff’s top ten hidden gems of birding. Here is the eighth of a blog series on these birds, by guest blogger Ed Pope.

The northern parula is a small warbler, roughly half the weight of a goldfinch. Its body looks slightly chubby, and its bill is thin and tail is short. White crescents line the eyes, and the plumage is bright yellow on the throat and chest. Males have a brown patch between the throat and chest. Most of the remainder of their feathers are a bluish-gray.

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Ed Pope

Guest Blogger

Ed Pope is a retired engineer from Rolls-Royce and a CILTI member since 2002.
Cedar waxwing

Who is that Masked Bird? Cedar Waxwing!

Our spring newsmagazine featured Cliff’s top ten hidden gems of birding. Here is the sixth of a blog series on these birds, by guest blogger Ed Pope.

The cedar waxwing is a songbird roughly the size of a song sparrow. The plumage over most of its body is fairly drab, consisting of brown or gray feathers. But this bird is a stunner, with bright red feathers on its wingtips, yellow on its tail and a black mask around its eyes.

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Yellow-Billed Cuckoo

“Knocking” Bird: Yellow-Billed Cuckoo

Our spring newsmagazine featured Cliff’s top ten hidden gems of birding. Here is the fourth of a blog series on these birds, by guest blogger Ed Pope.

This bird is slightly larger than a cardinal. Its long tail is brown on top, while the underside is black and white. The top of its head and back are brown, while the belly and lower part of the head are white. The lower bill is a bright yellow. Continue reading

Ed Pope

Guest Blogger

Ed Pope is a retired engineer from Rolls-Royce and a CILTI member since 2002.
Blossom Hollow, Photo by Dick Miller

Trek Our Trails Challenge features 5 popular nature preserves

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 10, 2021

You’ve been cooped up for months, and it’s time to get out and explore some of the most beautiful places in Central Indiana. Soon, wildflowers will be peeking through the forest floor, birdsong will be in the air, and Indiana’s nature preserves will be coming to life.

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Jen Schmits Thomas

Media Relations

An award-winning communicator and recognized leader in Central Indiana’s public relations community, Jen helps us tell our story in the media. She is the founder of JTPR, which she and her husband John Thomas own together.
Snowfall at Oliver's Woods

The Many Gifts of Snow

by Shawndra Miller, Communications Manager

I happen to love snow. Even if I complain about shoveling and hate to drive in it, I find real magic in the kind of big snowfall we had earlier this month. Snow has a way of transforming the world into a more beautiful place. A drab and muddy slog through midwinter becomes something cozy, pretty, downright festive. (I admit that working from home increases my appreciation of this kind of weather event!) Continue reading

Shawndra Miller

Communications Manager

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
Meltzer Woods photo by Jordan England

Announcing the Trek Our Trails Challenge

Are you ready for a nature fix? There’s still plenty of time to participate in a yearlong challenge that you can enjoy on your own. Make your way to a nature preserve to get started in the Trek Our Trails challenge! Continue reading

Shawndra Miller

Communications Manager

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
American beech

New bee species discovered at Avon’s Burnett Woods

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 2, 2018

Native bees could help crop pollination

Watch video footage from WRTV-6.

Amid a decline in pollinators nationwide, a species of bee never before seen in Indiana has been discovered at 20-year-old nature preserve not far from busy Rockville Road in Avon.

Burnett Woods Nature Preserve is an 80-acre property in Avon that the Central Indiana Land Trust has owned and managed since 1998. The Land Trust has worked with hundreds of local volunteers to clear invasive weeds such as Asian Bush Honeysuckle and Garlic Mustard, which take over and crowd out native species and wildflowers.

All that work means improved habitat for native plants and animals. The first reward for all that work is the discovery of the bee never before found in Indiana.

“This is validation of the hard work that’s gone into making the natural area healthy for native species,” said Cliff Chapman, executive director of the Central Indiana Land Trust.

A Hendricks County resident and entomologist, Robert P. Jean, Ph.D., collected the bee near native wildflowers. After studying it in his lab, Jean identified it as an Andrena uvulariae, which had never been recorded in Indiana and are found only occasionally in the eastern U.S.

“While we’re still learning a lot about bee species, we know this discovery is a big deal because the more native bees, the greater the opportunities for crop and wildflower pollination,” Chapman said. “If I were a farmer or gardener in Hendricks County, I’d be excited about this.”

Pollinators transfer pollen from one flower to another, fertilizing plants so they can grow and produce food. Without bees to spread pollen, many plants – including most food crops –would not reproduce.

Burnett Woods is home to black walnut, oak, hickory, maple and tulip poplar trees, as well as native wildflowers, which are particularly picturesque in springtime.

About Burnett Woods
Burnett Woods is an 80-acre nature preserve owned and managed by the Central Indiana Land Trust since 1998. It is dominated by tall black walnut, oak, hickory, maple and tulip poplar trees, as well as wildflowers and two loop trails. Located at 8264 E. County Rd. 100 S. in Avon, Burnett Woods is open daily from dawn to dusk and is a peaceful retreat from city life.

About the Central Indiana Land Trust
CILTI preserves the best of Central Indiana’s natural areas, protecting plants and animals, so Hoosiers can experience the wonder of the state’s natural heritage. Since it was created in 1990, CILTI has protected more than 5,200 acres of land that meet science-based criteria for conservation value. More information at www.ConservingIndiana.org.

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MEDIA CONTACT: Jen Schmits Thomas, jen@jtprinc.com, 317-441-2487

Jen Schmits Thomas

Media Relations

An award-winning communicator and recognized leader in Central Indiana’s public relations community, Jen helps us tell our story in the media. She is the founder of JTPR, which she and her husband John Thomas own together.