American badger

Saving Habitat for Endangered and Threatened Species

Part of a series on CILTI’s conservation targets by guest blogger Ed Pope

Some of Central Indiana’s core conservation areas contain plant or animal species that are endangered or threatened, either statewide or nationally: Continue reading

Ed Pope

Guest Blogger

Ed Pope is a retired engineer from Rolls-Royce and a CILTI member since 2002.
Eastern Box Turtle

Declining Eastern Box Turtles Benefit from Tree Plantings

Creating future habitat for Eastern box turtles and many other species, we kicked off our million tree initiative this year. We’ve pledged to plant one million trees over the coming years in strategic sites, linking up hundreds of acres of fragmented land to benefit sensitive wildlife. Our tree-planting efforts so far buffer Meltzer Woods, Glacier’s End, Mossy Point and Wallace F. Holladay Preserve. Continue reading

Shawndra Miller

Communications Specialist

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
Fire Pink at Blossom Hollow. Photo by Karen Wade

Shelby, Johnson county areas benefit from environmental settlement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 25, 2020

A $600,000 grant resulting from a legal settlement equips the Central Indiana Land Trust Inc. (CILTI) to add to the properties it protects in Johnson and Shelby counties. Continue reading

Jen Schmits Thomas

Media Relations

An award-winning communicator and recognized leader in Central Indiana’s public relations community, Jen helps us tell our story in the media. She is the founder of JTPR, which she and her husband John Thomas own together.

Land Trust plants first of 1 million trees

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 12, 2020

This week the Central Indiana Land Trust Inc. (CILTI) is planting 15,000 trees in Johnson and Parke counties. These are the first of CILTI’s 1 million trees being planted in Central Indiana and in addition to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s commitment to planting 1 million trees in the state over the next five years.

Continue reading

Jen Schmits Thomas

Media Relations

An award-winning communicator and recognized leader in Central Indiana’s public relations community, Jen helps us tell our story in the media. She is the founder of JTPR, which she and her husband John Thomas own together.
Worm-eating Warbler

Hills of Gold BioBlitz Report Complete

In the spring of 2016, CILTI partnered with the Indiana Academy of Science for our first ever Bioblitz. We are excited to now have the full report from this Bioblitz survey that took place on 695 acres of the Hills of Gold Conservation area (including the Blossom Hollow and Glacier’s End Preserves). We are also excited that CILTI’s Executive Director, Cliff Chapman, was an author on this published report.

This event brought 75 scientists, naturalists, and students who volunteered their expertise and time. Thirteen taxonomic teams were put together; the taxa included: bats, beetles, birds, fish, freshwater mussels, herpetofauna (reptiles and amphibians), lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), mammals, mushrooms, nonvascular plants, snail-killing flies, spiders, and vascular plants. In the end, the teams reported 548 taxa.

To read the published report, click here.

2016. Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science 125(2):126–136. Published and provided by the Indiana Academy of Science.

 

Shawndra Miller

Communications Specialist

Shawndra is in charge of sharing our story and connecting you to our work. Through our print and online materials, she hopes to inspire your participation in protecting special places for future generations.
Autumn at Glacier's End

New spider species discovered at Johnson County nature preserve

Release Date: Dec. 5, 2016

97 acres added to Glacier’s End Nature Preserve

As it announces the closing of a purchase that adds 97 acres to the Glacier’s End Nature Preserve, the Central Indiana Land Trust is also celebrating the discovery of a new species on that land.

Continue reading

Jen Schmits Thomas

Media Relations

An award-winning communicator and recognized leader in Central Indiana’s public relations community, Jen helps us tell our story in the media. She is the founder of JTPR, which she and her husband John Thomas own together.

Glacier’s End Nature Preserve created

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 15, 2015

Glacier’s End Nature Preserve created, to open in 2017

Central Indiana Land Trust closes on purchase of Johnson County site where glaciers stopped

In southwest Johnson County, a preserve 12,000 years in the making is now forever protected.  Glacial activity long ago helped to create unique geological formations and spawn a spectacular forest at this amazing site, now known as Glacier’s End Nature Preserve.

Thanks to a number of generous donors, the Central Indiana Land Trust recently closed on the purchase of Glacier’s End Nature Preserve.

In support of the largest purchase in the Land Trust’s history, funders contributed $707,000 to buy the property and protect it forever. A grant from Indiana’s Bicentennial Nature Trust provided $300,000 of that total. The land sits adjacent to two properties already protected by the Central Indiana Land Trust – the Laura Hare Preserve at Blossom Hollow and Bob’s Woods Conservation Easement – to create a 550-acre swatch of contiguous forestland.

Glacier’s End is exactly what its name would suggest: the place where the glaciers stopped their southward march.  Specifically, it is where the Wisconsinan Glaciation ran into the Brown County Hills. As a result, the property has both glaciated and unglaciated land, and supports a surprising diversity of flora and fauna within a tightly compressed area.

This massive conservation opportunity took root in the 1930s, when one Indiana family bought large swaths of the land, and the 1950s, when another family purchased adjoining lands. The two families collaborated with other partners in the 1960s to create Lamb Lake, the largest privately owned lake in the state. In recent years, the families worked together with the Land Trust to protect much of their remaining lands.

“Protecting contiguous forestland is important because in order to survive, many species need a block of 700 or more acres of mature forestland. Without that, species like the ovenbird and Eastern box turtle could disappear from Indiana,” said Cliff Chapman, executive director of the Central Indiana Land Trust.

The Land Trust couldn’t have accomplished this without a multitude of partners. Willing landowners – Randy and Sandy Lamb and family, and Tom and Priscilla Johnson and family – sold the property at a significant bargain price, and generous contributions came from the Bicentennial Nature Trust, The Nature Conservancy, Indiana Heritage Trust, Amos Butler Audubon and the Efroymson Family Fund.

The Land Trust plans to open the site for public access in 2017, after building parking areas for school buses, trails and educational signage.

Visitors will find a beautiful site that features clear running water, steep bluffs, exposed bedrock, shale bottom streams, and chunks of granite strewn across the valley floors. The area is a haven for rare species including the state endangered timid sedge, the Northern long-eared bat, red-shouldered hawk, hooded warbler and worm-eating warbler.  Many forest interior bird species are found here too.

For information on sites open now, visit www.ConservingIndiana.org.

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About the Central Indiana Land Trust

Through land protection, stewardship and education, the Central Indiana Land Trust preserves natural areas, improving air and water quality and enhancing life in our communities for present and future generations. Since it was created in 1990, the Land Trust has protected more than 4,000 acres of land that meet science-based criteria for conservation value.

MEDIA CONTACT:  Jen Schmits Thomas, jen@jtprinc.com, 317-441-2487